Focusing on mental health: School stress for children

Focusing on mental health: School stress for children



Jessica: We may be getting rid of the epidemic, but the impact on mental health can still be felt very strongly. Especially by our kids, especially when it comes to school. Here, turn your questions to Dr. Erica Lee, a psychologist at Boston Children’s Hospital. Dr. me thanks for being here. CHINA: Last week, mental health staff at Worcester Public Schools asked the School Committee to do more to provide support to students, teachers and families. Schools are already on the front lines here, how can parents help? >> It’s a great question. Schools absolutely. We know that when kids face a difficult team with their thoughts and feelings, learning is very difficult. One thing parents can do is partner with SCHL. I encourage parents. Advocate for your children by sharing your stories, and letting those in command know what families need right now. Really just acknowledging how difficult it all is for everyone and everyone has the same goal. Everyone tries to help the children. School staff have been asked to do a lot during PANDEC. The more they can cooperate, the better. Jessica: The issues that stood out the most were anxiety and depression. How do we check NCA with our kids at home, and what signs might be more serious? check in. Ask your children how they are doing. We ask the children how they are doing. Really make SCEPA and time to listen to their answers. Let the kids know that you find things a lot more difficult. You want to reassert TMHE There are ways to make things better. Together, you and your child may make a plan to get the support they need. The B could be at school and it could be through your pediatrician’s office, outside of a therapist or community support system. If your child’s symptoms get worse, now start noticing that TYHE can’t do the things they normally do during the day, they don’t want to finish usual activities or if they talk about wanting to hurt themselves. Chyna: We know that some of these concerns are due to the downfall of some children over the past two years. Aside from helping our kids catch up, can we talk to them about it and deal with the feelings that come with them? Many KSIDs are not where they want to be right now. This is understandable and it gave us what we’ve all been going for in the past couple of years. At home, even on a daily basis, parents can model and practice matching practices. This became a routine part of the family’s daily life. If you feel anxious or stressed, you can show how to respond in a proactive and healthy way. You can take a deep breath and speak out loud. In fact, the more children practice these types of strategies for everyday problems, the better. Jessica: Dr. Lee, thank you to your team and to our viewers if you have mental health questions

Focusing on mental health: School stress for children

Dr. Erica Lee, a psychologist at Boston Children’s Hospital, discusses how parents can talk to their children about school stress and the warning signs to watch for.

Dr. Erica Lee, a psychologist at Boston Children’s Hospital, discusses how parents can talk to their children about school stress and the warning signs to watch for.

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