Louisville Urban League Celebrates Launch of New Entrepreneurship Center

Local leaders celebrate the launch of the Louisville Urban League Center for Entrepreneurship. The idea for him is to help local black business owners thrive. On Monday, Louisville’s Road Ahead, which began as an idea, became a reality to create generational black wealth for black business owners. It’s about creating opportunities that didn’t exist before. “The opportunities and opportunities to sow seeds through T-shirts and leave a message and impact to tell a story,” said Sow Journey CEO Darla Thompson. “We appreciate partners like Republic Bank, I know they started a $3 million fund for black companies,” Thompson said. “We know the Community Foundation brings organizations together to talk about this ecosystem, this place, and how we’re doing it.” Cynthia Brown, director of the Center for Entrepreneurship, emphasized the relevance of what the center was trying to do. “What we want to be is that one stop where people come in, where people can come in and check on those foundational things like LLCs. Are they in good standing? Do you have your tax IDs? That kind of thing is made up,” Brown said. From a number of community partnerships with entities such as Amped and their Business Incubator Program as well as the Russell Place of Promise. “You don’t know what you don’t know, and for black business owners in particular, especially in West Louisville, when you think of all things,” Brown said. that marginalized this community from re-planning to urban renewal.” Sow Journey is a Thompson-run business at Norton Sports and Learning Center, who had the opportunity after receiving support from an entrepreneurial center that gave her the foundation to run a successful business while still maintaining her side job. In being a barber.” Soul Journey, Soul Journeys are somewhat symbolic of the upcoming Juneteenth celebration, and they only tell of the journey from Mother Africa. You can see the pictures in the T-shirt like what happened…so the spirits of the trip are those people still here on the trip,” Thompson said. Brown said Thompson is exactly the kind of story they like, and Brown said, “When I look at Darla, it was her The reason we do this.” “That’s what you wish for all the entrepreneurs you work with.” Thompson said, “You don’t know those people are out there. It just felt like Christmas.” “So, it’s a great opportunity, and for those entrepreneurs out there like me, keep dreaming and keep doing the work.” Just keep doing the work. That’s what the center is all about. A historical document published by local leaders shows in In 2020 there is an estimated 13 to 1 wealth gap between whites and blacks in Louisville.

Local leaders celebrate the launch of the Louisville Urban League Center for Entrepreneurship.

The idea behind this is to help local black business owners thrive.

On Monday, Louisville’s Road Ahead, which began as an idea, became a reality to create generational black wealth for black business owners.

It’s about creating opportunities where they didn’t exist before.

“An opportunity and opportunity to sow seeds through T-shirts and leave a message and impact to tell a story,” said Sow Journey CEO Darla Thompson.

“We appreciate partners like Republic Bank, and I know they have started a $3 million fund for black businesses,” Thompson said. “We know the Community Foundation is inviting organizations to talk about this ecosystem, this place, and how we’re doing it.”

Cynthia Brown, Director of the Center for Entrepreneurship, emphasized the relevance of what the Center is trying to do.

“What we want to be is that one stop where people come in, where people can come and check on those foundational things like LLCs. Are they in good standing? Do you have your tax IDs? That kind of thing,” Brown said.

The Center is made up of a number of community partnerships with entities such as Amped and their Business Incubation Program as well as the Russell Place of Promise.

“You don’t know what you don’t know, and for black business owners in particular, especially in West Louisville, when you think about all the things that have marginalized this community from re-planning to urban renewal,” Brown said.

Sow Journey is a Thompson-operated business at Norton Sports and Learning Center.

She was given the opportunity after receiving support from the Entrepreneurship Center which gave her the foundation to run a successful business while still maintaining her side job of being a barber.

“Soul Journey, Spirit Journeys is kind of symbolic of the upcoming Juneteenth celebration, and it just tells of the journey from Mother Africa. You can see the images in the T-shirt like what happened… So the spirits of the journey are those people still here on a journey,” Thompson said.

Brown said Thompson is exactly the kind of story they like.

“When I look at Darla, she was the reason we did it,” Brown said. “This is what you wish for all the entrepreneurs you work with.”

“You don’t know these guys are out there,” Thompson said. “It felt like Christmas.” “So it’s a great opportunity, and for those entrepreneurs out there like me, keep dreaming and keep doing the work.”

Just keep doing the work. This is what the center is all about.

A landmark document released by local leaders in 2020 shows that there is an estimated 13 to 1 wealth gap between whites and blacks in Louisville.