“Satch” Sanders shares his thoughts on the Celtics’ run to the NBA Finals

Tom “Satch” Sanders knows a thing or two about what it takes to win the NBA championship. The Basketball Hall of Fame won eight titles in 13 seasons with the Boston Celtics (1960-1973), often while guarding an opponent’s biggest offensive threat. When it comes to the Celtics’ current path to the NBA Finals, Sanders was particularly impressed with the team’s collective sense of calm. “I’m not really excited or afraid or nervous or anything,” Sanders said. “It seems like this team likes to play basketball, likes to play together, and it’s such a difficult thing to get along with.” The Celtics have shown a lot of power on the road this season, going 7-2 away from TD Garden ahead of the NBA Finals. Boston then improved that record with a first-game win over the Golden State Warriors in San Francisco, but when it comes to home play, the Celtics are only 5-4 ahead of the TD Garden to enter the NBA Finals. However, Sanders doesn’t think the home record has anything to do with a team that plays less in Boston. “The fact that they’re not doing well at home has nothing to do with the stress at home. Let’s call it that,” he said. “When you’re on the road at rest, you have nothing else to do but think about why you’re there. Nowadays, the way men travel: Journey on just that purpose and then jump on the trip and go home…so there’s no Something that takes them away from the center of the game. At home, it could be anything. It could be stress. It could be parenting conversations. It could be a wife, kids. It could be a lot of friends saying, “What are you going to do tonight?” Are you going to kill them?” It could be all kinds of pressure and external pressure.” Sanders said that during his playing days, he enjoyed the idea of ​​getting into a hostile environment and silencing the audience. “It’s always fun,” he said. “It’s always fun to play around and say, ‘Did you guys make fun of me?'” Did you call me some names? Here, take this! After his playing days with the Celtics, Sanders coached the Harvard basketball team for four seasons (1973-77), becoming the first black person to serve as a head coach for any sport in the Ivy League. He then joined C as an assistant coach in 1977 before taking over A part-time head coach in 1978, Sanders then founded a number of NBA player programs, including the league’s Rookie Transition Program in 1968. The NBA’s Rookie Transition Program was the first such program in any sport Great American.

Tom “Satch” Sanders knows a thing or two about what it takes to win the NBA championship.

The Basketball Hall of Fame won eight titles in 13 seasons with the Boston Celtics (1960-1973), often while guarding an opponent’s biggest offensive threat.

When it came to the Celtics’ current run to the NBA Finals, Sanders was particularly impressed with the team’s collective sense of calm.

“I’m not really excited or afraid or nervous or anything,” Sanders said. “None of those terms, they don’t apply.” “It seems like this team likes to play basketball, likes to play together, and that’s very difficult to put together.”

The Celtics showed plenty of power on the road in this post-season, as they slid 7-2 away from TD Garden ahead of the NBA Finals. Then Boston beat this record Their Match 1 victory over the Golden State Warriors in San Francisco.

But when it comes to home play, the Celtics are only 5-4 ahead of the TD Garden to enter the NBA Finals. However, Sanders doesn’t think the domestic record has anything to do with a team that plays less in Boston.

He said, “The fact that they are not doing well at home has nothing to do with the pressures at home. Let’s call it that.” “When you’re on the road at rest, you have nothing else to do but think about why you’re there. Nowadays, the way men travel: Journey on just that purpose and then jump on the trip and go home…so there’s no Something that takes them away from the center of the game. At home, it could be anything. It could be stress. It could be parenting conversations. It could be a wife, kids. It could be a lot of friends saying, “What are you going to do tonight?” Are you going to kill them?” It could be all kinds of stress and external pressure.”

Sanders said that during his playing days, he enjoyed the idea of ​​getting into a hostile environment and silencing the audience.

“It’s always fun,” he said. “It’s always fun to play around and say, ‘Did you guys make fun of me?'” Did you call me some names? Here, take this! “

After his playing days with the Celtics, Sanders coached the Harvard University basketball team for four seasons (1973-77), becoming the first black person to serve as the head coach of any sport in the Ivy League. He then joined C as an assistant coach in 1977 before taking over as part-time head coach in 1978.

Sanders then founded a number of NBA player programs, including the league’s Rookie Transition Program in 1968. The NBA’s Rookie Transition Program was the first such program in any major American sport.

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